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Automakers

Once a tech leader, Japan's auto industry plays catch-up

Mazda's coming technology blitz epitomizes the rush by the Japanese carmakers to keep pace in an era of rapid change.


Tesla misunderstands 'positive' Model 3 rating, Consumer Reports says

Consumer Reports said Tesla apparently misunderstood the "average" reliability rating the magazine assigned to the Model 3 sedan this week, calling it generally "positive" for an all-new vehicle.

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MORE OEM/SUPPLIER NEWS MANUFACTURING REGULATION/SAFETY
High-tech taxi for old-school Japan

In the era of Uber and ride-hailing, Toyota is turning its attention to building a better taxi that could give Tokyo's streetscape its biggest makeover in two decades.

UPDATED: 10/20/17 9:38 am ET - adds details
Bentley to replace CEO, 3 board members in overhaul

Wolfgang Durheimer will step down as CEO of Bentley effective February 1 and be succeeded by Adrian Hallmark, former global strategy director at Jaguar Land Rover. Bentley's heads of engineering, sales and marketing, and human resources are also stepping down in a major overhaul.

Aston Martin moves beyond sports cars to Miami real estate

Aston Martin is pushing into U.S. real estate for the first time in an effort to establish a broader luxury brand. The automaker is building a 66-story apartment tower in downtown Miami that will feature 391 condominiums with prices ranging from $600,000 to $50 million.

Nissan's lax inspections started at least 20 years ago, report says

Nissan's inappropriate inspection practices have been going for at least 20 years, Japanese broadcaster NHK said. The report followed a decision by the automaker to suspend domestic vehicle production to address misconduct in its final inspection procedures, which has led to a recall of 1.2 million cars sold in Japan.

UPDATED: 10/20/17 10:01 am ET - adds details
Death of Australian car output leaves chasm

GM closed its Holden factory in Australia on Friday, ending more than a century of car manufacturing in the country. Hundreds of workers will be left jobless, just weeks after Toyota shut a plant in neighboring Victoria state, where Ford closed two sites last year.

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